Postpartum Onset OCD

During the perinatal period, Women are at an increased risk for the onset and/or exacerbation of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

According to a recent study published in 2021: the point prevalence gradually increased over the course of pregnancy and the early postpartum, attaining a peak of close to 9% at approximately 8 weeks postpartum, with a gradual decline thereafter. On the other hand, postpartum OCD has high comorbidity with MDD.

From a clinical standpoint, it is vital to have knowledge on how to differentiate postpartum OCD from postpartum depression and postpartum psychosis

Let’s begin by answering this question first:

Understanding the difference between postpartum OCD, Postpartum Depression and Postpartum Psychosis is vital. Which of the following statement is WRONG?

Answer: All are correct statments

FOR ACADEMY MEMBERS:

WOMEN'S MENTAL HEALTH

POSTPARTUM ONSET
OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER

SPEAKER: DR. MARY KIMMEL

SPEAKER: DR. MARY KIMMEL

Dr. Mary Kimmel is the medical director of NC Maternal Mental Health MATTERS program & Co-Director of UNC’s Perinatal Psychiatry Program. She has discussed this clinically relevant topic in the following sections:

  • Case examples: (a) “Normal” mom worries, (b) Postpartum OCD, or (c) Postpartum psychosis.
  • Underlying Biology and Neuroanatomy involved in postpartum onset OCD
  • Postpartum mood symptoms & 5 symptoms dimensions of obsessions and compulsions in the postpartum period.
  • Differentiating (a) OCD and postpartum depression; (b) OCD and postpartum Psychosis.
  • Risk assessment of harm to the baby.
  • Postpartum OCD in fathers.
  • Treatment algorithm of (a) Postpartum OCD; (b) Postpartum Psychosis.

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